Would Voltaire have made a good PhD supervisor? Voltaire mentors Vauvenargues

Luc de Clapiers, Marquis de Vauvenargues

Luc de Clapiers, Marquis de Vauvenargues (1715-1747), by Charles Amédée Colin.

A current work in progress at the Voltaire Foundation relates to one of Voltaire’s less-discussed friendships that ended all too soon due to a fatal illness. On 4 April 1743, Luc de Clapiers, Marquis de Vauvenargues, penned the philosophe an enthusiastic letter comparing the merits of France’s two most celebrated tragedians, Pierre Corneille and Jean Racine. The combination of strong opinions and well-placed flattery must have caught Voltaire’s attention, for he wrote back less than two weeks later. The 27-year-old Vauvenargues brazenly criticised Corneille’s declamatory style and lack of subtlety, arguing that ‘surtout Corneille paroît ignorer que les hommes se caractérisent souvent d’avantage par les choses qu’ils ne disent pas, que par celles qu’ils disent’. Never one to stand at the sidelines of a literary debate, Voltaire’s reply praised Vauvenargues for his good taste in preferring Racine while offering a judicious defence of Corneille, counting that ‘il y a des choses si sublimes dans Corneille au milieu de ses froids raisonnements, et même des choses si touchantes, qu’il doit être respecté avec ses défauts’ (15 April 1743). This began a lively exchange between the two men, as Vauvenargues iconoclastically refused to yield ground to Voltaire’s more balanced take on the playwright’s merits and flaws: ‘Monsieur, Je suis au désespoir que vous me forciez à respecter Corneille’ (22 April 1743).

As well as offering us an entertaining example of an eighteenth-century celebrity’s interactions with a fan, this exchange is important because, after befriending Voltaire, Vauvenargues began to see the philosophe as a mentor figure, asking him for advice on his own Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain, which was supplemented by his Réflexions et maximes and published for the first time in 1746. Any PhD student can imagine the huge sigh of relief Vauvenargues must have let out when Voltaire wrote back on 15 February 1746 to say that he liked it even before he had finished reading it. The young author’s joy is palpable in his response to his mentor’s praise, thanking him for taking the time to provide suggestions and corrections for the work’s improvement (15 May 1746). Vauvenargues then substantially revised his text and published a second edition in 1747.

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain, p.79 (Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence).

As part of our work on Voltaire’s marginalia, we are interested firstly in the kind of suggestions the philosophe made in the annotated copy he sent back to Vauvenargues, and secondly to what extent did the latter incorporate these suggestions into the revised version of his book. The work of cross-referencing the annotated first edition and the revised second edition revealed some interesting patterns. In the cases where the corrections are easy remedies, for example a different choice of wording or a quick clarificatory remark, Vauvenargues has mostly deferred to Voltaire’s wisdom and edited his manuscript accordingly. Things got trickier when Voltaire suggested structural changes or major additions, both things which Vauvenargues appeared more reluctant to carry out. This is most likely because the revisions were extremely time-sensitive, given that Vauvenargues was in ill-health and had to rush to edit and publish the second edition of his work before he died later that year at the age of thirty-one. It is perhaps for this reason that he did not find the time to develop a section on page 75 by which Voltaire has scribbled ‘cela merite plus de détail’.

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain, p.86 (Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence).

As with any patterns, there are notable exceptions. More mystifying are instances such as on page 86 where Voltaire asks ‘pour quoy longue?’, seemingly questioning Vauvenargues’s choice of adjective. This should have been an easy fix for the marquis. In the second edition, however, Vauvenargues has edited this sentence but kept the very same adjective that Voltaire did not like: ‘L’étonnement une surprise longue & accablante; l’admiration une surprise pleine de respect.’ Similarly, one of the sassiest comments can be found on page 88 where Vauvenargues writes that ‘il y auroit là-dessus des réflexions à faire aussi nouvelles que curieuses’, to which Voltaire witheringly retorts ‘faites les donc’. Vauvenargues does indeed revise this passage in his second edition, but chooses not to elaborate on what these reflections might be, writing that he has ‘ni la volonté, ni le pouvoir’ to do so.

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain, p.88 (Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence).

Like any good supervisor, Voltaire does not hold back in his criticism of his student’s work: what is most striking is the sheer volume of corrections, additions and suggestions, some of which are more helpful than others. Sometimes he is perhaps a little harsh, accusing Vauvenargues of writing ‘mauvaise poésie’ on more than a couple of occasions. One of his most scathing comments comes towards the end of the list of maxims that forms the second part of the text. Vauvenargues makes the not-very-insightful remark that ‘quelque amour qu’on ait pour les grandes affaires, il y a peu de lectures si ennuyeuses & si fatiguantes que celles d’un Traité entre des Princes’, next to which his mentor has incredulously scribbled ‘c’est bien la peine d’imprimer cela?’ It’s safe to say that any PhD student would be horrified to have elicited such a remark from their supervisor!

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain

Introduction à la connaissance de l’esprit humain, p.364 (Bibliothèque Méjanes, Aix-en-Provence).

But above all, Voltaire is a meticulous reader, picking up on ideas repeated from many pages back and highlighting the slightest inconsistency. Equally, neither does he shy away from complimenting Vauvenargues’s work when it is deserving: several sections receive a smattering of ‘bien’, ‘beau’, ‘fort’, ‘excellent’ and even a ‘fin et profond et juste’, which more than make up for the moments of criticism.

– Sam Bailey

Sam is a PhD student at the University of Durham and a frequent VF collaborator.

An earlier blog post on this same subject by Gillian Pink can be found here.

Advertisements

‘Vous êtes la première chose que je vois en m’éveillant’: portraits in Voltaire’s bedroom

Voltaire had many bedrooms during his long life, but the best documented is the one at the Château de Ferney, where he spent a considerable portion of his last twenty years, sleeping, working, or entertaining guests.[1]

The team recently restoring the château faced a quandary. Since Voltaire’s death, the pictures hanging in his bedroom have been changed and a cenotaph added, some of the room’s walls knocked down, and finally its contents transferred to a different room altogether. It was decided that, rather than recreating a room from the 1760s or 1770s that no longer exists, Voltaire’s ‘bedroom’ should be kept much as visitors have known it since the mid-nineteenth century.

Voltaire’s bedroom in his lifetime

Perhaps Voltaire’s bedroom at Ferney was originally hung with portraits of family members, including those done in pastel by his youngest niece, Mme Dompierre de Fontaine, of herself and of her son, as had been the case at Les Délices. Perhaps Mme Du Châtelet’s portrait was also there from the start.

By 1765, some friends in Paris had come up with the idea of getting Carmontelle’s gouache of the Calas family in prison engraved to raise money for the Calas family. On 17 January 1766, Voltaire wrote to Calas’s widow that he would keep the planned engraving at his bedside, even though he had never met her, ‘et le premier objet que je verrai en m’éveillant sera la vertu persécutée et respectée’. This in due course he did, writing on 9 May: ‘J’ai baisé votre estampe, Madame, je l’ai placée au chevet de mon lit. Vous et votre famille vous êtes la première chose que je vois en m’éveillant. Monsieur votre fils Pierre est parfaitement ressemblant, je suis persuadé que vous l’êtes de même’.

Jean Huber was no doubt the first to depict Voltaire in his bedroom, in a painting (or three) that displeased its main subject. This irreverent image of him in his nightclothes proliferated in the form of engravings: there is one with a maid, one with verse designed to irritate Voltaire, even one with a portrait of his arch-enemy Fréron hanging on his wall. Grimm reported in his Correspondance littéraire of 1 November 1772 that Voltaire had not yet forgiven Huber for this loss of control over his public image. But how faithful was the depiction of his bedroom? The version in the St Petersburg Hermitage Museum has red curtains, while the one at the Musée Voltaire has blue. Musée Carnavalet also has blue, but shows an engraving of Carmontelle’s painting of the Calas family in prison hanging near the head of the bed.

Le lever du philosophe de Ferney

Le lever du philosophe de Ferney, one of many engravings based on a painting by Jean Huber. Courtesy of the Centre d’iconographie of the Bibliothèque de Genève.

In 1774, a new portrait was given the distinction of being placed close to Voltaire’s bed. This time it was the actor Lekain as Nero drawn in pastel by Pierre Martin Barat: ‘Vous êtes à côté de mon lit, mon cher ami, et le souvenir de vos talents et de votre mérite sera toujours dans mon cœur’.

In June 1775, Amélie Suard mentioned two other images, Mme Du Châtelet’s portrait and a second Calas engraving, the one by Daniel Nikolaus Chodowiecki entitled Les adieux de Calas à sa famille, again inside Voltaire’s bed: ‘dans l’intérieur de son lit il a les deux gravures de la famille des Calas. Je ne connaissais pas encore celle qui représente la femme et les enfants de cette victime du fanatisme, embrassant leur père au moment où on va le mener au supplice; elle me fit l’impression la plus douloureuse, et je reprochai à M. de Voltaire de l’avoir placée de manière à l’avoir sans cesse sous ses yeux’. Mme Suard nevertheless went on to heap praise on Voltaire for the good he had done the whole of humanity. No doubt the engraving was to Voltaire as much a reminder of success as of ‘la vertu persécutée’.

In January 1776, another flurry of engravings set in Voltaire’s bedroom incurred his displeasure. Vivant Denon had visited in early July 1775 and showed Voltaire sitting up in bed, surrounded by members of his household and a mutual friend, the composer Jean-Benjamin de Laborde (although he had not been present at the time). Only the first Calas engraving can be seen inside Voltaire’s bed curtains. Was it the invasion of a ‘private’ space that Voltaire objected to? Or the juxtaposition of the serious Calas image and a frivolous social one? In any case, he complained to Vivant Denon that ‘Un homme qui se tiendrait dans l’attitude qu’on me donne, et qui rirait comme on me fait rire, serait trop ridicule’.

Le déjeuner de Ferney

Le déjeuner de Ferney, based on a picture by Vivant Denon, and engraved as part of a set with the Lever de Voltaire (above). The ‘déjeuner’ seems to consist of just one hot drink between, from left to right, Père Adam, Laborde, Voltaire, the servant known as la ‘belle Agathe’ (Agathe Perrachon, née Frik), and Mme Denis. Courtesy of the Centre d’iconographie of the Bibliothèque de Genève.

The inventory that was made of Voltaire’s property after his death lists ‘four medium paintings with gilded frames’ in his room, but only identifies one of his mother, Marie-Marguerite Arouet (possibly this painting), and one of his eldest niece and companion, Mme Denis (possibly the fourth image on this page, formerly attributed to Carle van Loo and now, tentatively, to François-Hubert Drouais,[2] and copied in pastel by Mme Denis’s sister, Mme Dompierre de Fontaine).

Voltaire’s bedroom after his death

The marquis de Villette soon bought the château and owned it until 1785. On 23 November 1779, the Mémoires secrets gave an extract from a letter stating that he had kept Voltaire’s room just as it was – while at the same time installing a cenotaph (later moved to the main salon) and assembling Voltaire’s favourite portraits there: apparently these included those of Catherine the Great, Frederick, one of Frederick’s sisters, Mme Du Châtelet, Lekain, D’Alembert, d’Argental, as well as Villette himself and his wife…

A 1781 engraving which seems to take artistic licence with the room’s layout shows the cenotaph and no fewer than forty easily identifiable portraits of illustrious contemporaries, men and women, lining the walls. A portrait of Mme Denis which looks very like a detail of the Vivant Denon engraving hangs in the place of honour at the head of the bed. No Calas engravings are visible.

Chambre du cœur de Voltaire

Chambre du cœur de Voltaire, drawn by Duché and engraved by François Denis Née, 1781. Courtesy of the Centre d’iconographie of the Bibliothèque de Genève.

The room looks quite different in an engraving from the first quarter of the nineteenth century. The bed curtains and cover have visibly shrunk as successive visitors cut small mementoes for themselves, and the portraits on show are limited to five: Catherine the Great’s portrait woven in silk by Philippe de Lasalle (given to Voltaire by Lasalle in 1771), Frederick the Great painted in oil by Anna Dorothea Liszewska Therbusch (sent by Frederick, at Voltaire’s request, in 1775), the previously mentioned pastel of Lekain by Barat (1774), a pastel of Voltaire attributed to Maurice Quentin de La Tour (1735?), and an oil painting of Mme Du Châtelet by Marie-Anne Loir (presumably before 1749).

Chambre de Voltaire à Ferney

Chambre de Voltaire à Ferney, by Charles Philibert Lasteyrie du Saillant, c.1820. Courtesy of the Centre d’iconographie of the Bibliothèque de Genève.

This matches the description by a visitor published in The New Monthly Magazine in 1824, which also lists the prints ‘on each side of the window which faces the bed’, i.e. the fourth wall not on the engraving. The line-up is now thoroughly male: Diderot, Newton, Franklin, Racine, Milton, Washington, Corneille, and Marmontel on one side, and Thomas, Leibnitz, Mairan, D’Alembert, Helvétius, and the duc de Choiseul on the other. The first Calas engraving and a ‘sort of emblematical print of the tomb of Voltaire in Paris, dedicated to la marquise de Villette, dame de Ferney’ complete the set for this wall.

The visitor then mentions two more pictures somewhat at odds with the royals and intellectuals filling the walls: ‘In another part of the room are two very pretty pictures of a boy and a Madonna-looking girl, which our old Cicerone said were painted by order of Voltaire. The boy is a Savoyard, with a tattered cocked-hat, and the young woman, we were told, was ‘La blanchisseuse’ […] If it were really of the blanchisseuse, I can only say that Voltaire had a very pretty washerwoman’. Another engraving situates a ‘repasseuse’ and a ‘ramoneur’ (no doubt the same blanchisseuse and Savoyard) on the left-hand side of the room.

Intérieur de la chambre de Voltaire à Ferney

Intérieur de la chambre de Voltaire à Ferney, painted by Jean DuBois and engraved by Spengler & Cie, c.1840. Courtesy of the Centre d’iconographie of the Bibliothèque de Genève.

Twenty years later, Jules Michelet’s guide must have had a more vivid imagination, since the historian noted in his journal for Monday 14 August 1843 that Voltaire had launched the career of the ‘savoyard’ who became an ironmonger on the corner of the rue de Beaune and that the ‘blanchisseuse’ was in fact a daughter he had had with one of Mme Denis’s chambermaids… In his Dictionary of pastellists, Neil Jeffares identifies her as the wife of Voltaire’s secretary Wagnière.[3] The Savoyard still hangs in Voltaire’s room and is sometimes identified as the pastel by Voltaire’s youngest niece of her son d’Hornoy that she sent him in 1755. It is clearly derived from Drouais’s Jeune garçon au tricorne and, since Mme Dompierre de Fontaine copied the Drouais painting of her sister, this doesn’t seem entirely implausible.

Flaubert left a soulful description of his visit to the château in 1845, carefully itemising the bed, the pictures, and the cenotaph, as so many had done before him, but also mentioning the wall hangings: ‘la tenture est de soie jaune à fleurs’ (the blue background having faded beyond recognition): ‘On voudrait y être enfermé pendant tout un jour à s’y promener seul. Triste et vide, le jour vert, livide du feuillage, pénétrait par les carreaux; on était pris d’une tristesse étrange, on regrettait cette belle vie remplie, cette existence si intellectuellement turbulente du dix-huitième siècle, et on se figurait l’homme passant de son salon dans sa chambre, ouvrant toutes ces portes…’

He must have been one of the last visitors to witness it in this state. Voltaire’s and his housekeeper’s rooms were soon knocked through and Voltaire’s room set up again in the now more appropriately sized ‘cabinet de tableaux et du billard’ on the other side of the central salon, where the large portrait of Queen Maria Theresa was presumably already set into the wall. Catherine the Great was hung at the head of the bed and Lekain under the little that was left of the canopy crown.

La chambre à coucher de Voltaire à Ferney

La chambre à coucher de Voltaire à Ferney, after a drawing by de Drée, 1869? Other drawings of Ferney by de Drée appeared in Le Monde illustré on 30 January 1869. Courtesy of the Centre d’iconographie of the Bibliothèque de Genève.

Later changes, which I won’t go into, are documented by photographs, like this postcard for the early twentieth-century tourist.

Château de Ferney – Chambre à coucher de Voltaire

Château de Ferney – Chambre à coucher de Voltaire, postcard by Charnaux frères et Co., Geneva. Courtesy of ETH-Bibliothek Zürich, Bildarchiv.

Voltaire’s bedroom today

Today Maria Teresa still dominates the room, but the silk wall hangings and bed curtains and cover have been beautifully restored and Carmontelle’s Malheureuse famille Calas reclaimed its place inside the bed curtains. The other four pictures retained to decorate the room, besides various prints, are Voltaire himself and Lekain on the one side and Mme Du Châtelet and the Savoyard on the other. But if, like Flaubert, you wish to imagine Voltaire passing from his salon to his bedroom, you might want to stand in what is now the ‘cabinet de tableaux’ (moved into the much larger space of the two bedrooms knocked together) to do so.

– Alice Breathe

[1] Christophe Paillard, ‘Entre tourisme et pèlerinage, voyage d’affaires et expérience littéraire: Jean-Louis Wagnière, acteur et témoin de la “visite à Ferney”’, Orages 8, March 2009, p.21-50.

[2] With thanks to Neil Jeffares for pointing out that the oil painting of Mme Denis is no longer at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont.

[3] Ref. J.9.2901.

Voltaire en notre temps : le Cellf et la Voltaire Foundation

Sylvain Menant est professeur émérite à Sorbonne Université, ancien directeur du Cellf, il est, depuis 1988, membre du Conseil scientifique des Œuvres complètes de Voltaire, pour lesquelles il a signé de nombreuses éditions critiques dont celle des Contes de Guillaume Vadé en 2014.

La Voltaire Foundation, à Oxford.

La Voltaire Foundation, à Oxford.

L’acronyme « Cellf » désigne le « Centre d’étude de la langue et des littératures françaises », centre de recherches de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne (fondue depuis le 1er janvier 2018 dans Sorbonne Université) et du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Jusqu’à une période récente, ce centre de recherches était spécialisé dans l’étude des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles. Son prestige a amené les autorités de tutelle à élargir ses compétences à tous les siècles, sous la direction du Pr Christophe Martin. Cet élargissement n’a en rien nui à l’étude des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, que nous considérons comme « un siècle de deux cents ans »[1], étude qui rassemble de nombreux professeurs, chercheurs à temps plein, chercheurs associés et doctorants. Ils se réunissent dans quelques salles de travail au deuxième étage de la Sorbonne, au milieu des livres et des machines. Par les hautes fenêtres, on aperçoit, juste en face, de l’autre côté de la rue Saint-Jacques, le collège (aujourd’hui lycée) Louis-le-Grand où le jeune Arouet, futur Voltaire, fut élève des Pères jésuites. Le Cellf a célébré cette année son cinquantième anniversaire par un colloque de trois jours où ont été évoquées ses recherches passées, présentes et à venir, complété par des festivités diverses. Il a tenu à associer la Voltaire Foundation à cette célébration ; elle y a été représentée par l’un de ses membres actifs, Gillian Pink, qui a pris la parole ; elle a participé à la mise au point de nombreux volumes tout en préparant une excellente thèse soutenue en 2015[2].

Réunion du Conseil scientifique des Œuvres complètes

Réunion du Conseil scientifique des Œuvres complètes de juin 2016. Assis, de gauche à droite: Marie-Hélène Cotoni, Christiane Mervaud, Jeroom Vercruysse; debout, de gauche à droite: Gérard Laudin, Gerhardt Stenger, Nicholas Cronk, John R. Iverson, Sylvain Menant, Russell Goulbourne, François Moureau.

Depuis sa création, le Cellf, par le nombre de chercheurs spécialisés qu’il a accueillis et le nombre de thèses soutenues, par le nombre des publications et des colloques, est le principal centre mondial de recherches sur Voltaire et de formation de jeunes voltairistes. La Voltaire Foundation, devenue un organe de l’Université d’Oxford après avoir été implantée à Genève, est le prestigieux centre d’édition d’une collection complète des œuvres de Voltaire et de travaux critiques sur cet écrivain et son temps. Les deux institutions, de nature et d’objet différents et complémentaires, entretiennent depuis longtemps une féconde et cordiale collaboration. De nombreux chercheurs appartiennent aux deux institutions et y jouent un rôle actif. Symboliquement, le Conseil scientifique des Œuvres complètes de Voltaire publiées à la Voltaire Foundation tient sa réunion annuelle dans les murs du Cellf, souvent sous la présidence d’un membre de notre laboratoire. Symétriquement, nous sommes nombreux à traverser la Manche pour participer à des réunions de travail ou à des comités, faire des recherches dans les riches fonds de la Bodleian ou présenter une conférence sur tel ou tel aspect renouvelé des connaissances sur Voltaire.

Pourquoi ce titre pour célébrer la collaboration du Cellf et de la VF : « Voltaire en notre temps » ? Loin de nous l’idée de chercher naïvement dans l’œuvre ou la vie de cet écrivain des conseils pour régler les problèmes du monde d’aujourd’hui. Ceux qui crient : « au secours, Voltaire » n’ont lu de son œuvre que des fragments orientés. Tout au contraire, nous avons pour objet depuis l’origine de débarrasser Voltaire des récupérations intéressées dont son œuvre a été l’objet au XIXe siècle, récupération par les monarchistes de ce partisan de l’absolutisme, récupération par les élites de ce contempteur de la « populace » et de cet ennemi de l’instruction populaire, récupération par les sans-Dieu de cet anticlérical. Notre temps est celui d’une approche scientifique neutre du phénomène Voltaire, d’une utilisation des moyens les plus neufs d’approche des textes et des faits, d’une mise à disposition des publics d’aujourd’hui de l’œuvre et de ses arrière-plans. Notre temps est ainsi celui d’une redécouverte d’un Voltaire débarbouillé des lectures partisanes, et enrichi d’une nouvelle et prodigieuse érudition. C’est l’esprit qui anime à la fois les voltairistes du Cellf et ceux d’Oxford.

Leur entreprise est commune depuis le début, et elle commence avant même la création des deux institutions. En 1967 à Saint-Andrews en Écosse, en marge d’une rencontre internationale de spécialistes du XVIIIe siècle, un mécène anglais passionné, Theodore Besterman, lance l’idée de publier une édition complète des œuvres de Voltaire, alors que la plus récente datait de 1875. Besterman, dès ce moment et jusqu’à aujourd’hui au-delà de sa mort, consacre sa fortune à cette entreprise ; il est le fondateur de la Voltaire Foundation. René Pomeau, professeur à la Sorbonne et futur membre important de notre laboratoire dès sa création, fait partie du comité international qui s’engage dans cette tâche immense, qui totalisera environ deux cent volumes. Il recrute des collaborateurs français, surtout parmi ses nombreux élèves, comme Marie-Hélène Cotoni, Jean Dagen, Christiane Mervaud, José-Michel Moureaux, Roland Virolle, une dizaine d’autres, et moi-même. Quand le Cellf est créé, l’équipe des voltairistes, déjà nombreuse, soudée et active, constitue une des pierres angulaires de la nouvelle institution de recherche. Les textes à éditer sont distribués selon les compétences de chacun ; les œuvres les plus volumineuses sont prises en charge en équipe ; les premiers résultats du travail circulent, sont enrichis ou corrigés au passage ; les collaborateurs spécialisés de la Voltaire Foundation contribuent à la chasse aux copies manuscrites, aux vérifications bibliographiques, au relevé des variantes, et assurent une impeccable préparation du texte pour l’imprimeur.

À l’origine, il s’agissait surtout de fournir au public moderne le texte devenu introuvable de l’ensemble des écrits de Voltaire, dont seuls quelques titres, les plus connus, étaient disponibles en librairie. Mais nous étions désireux de partager les découvertes faites au cours de nos recherches d’éditeurs, et conscients des difficultés que présente pour un lecteur moderne, même spécialiste, la foule d’allusions et de sous-entendus dont fourmillent les textes de Voltaire. Bientôt les introductions, les notes, les annexes se multiplièrent, et l’édition est devenue un monument d’une extraordinaire richesse, une somme capable de faire comprendre Voltaire en notre temps, autant que faire se peut.

La Religion de Voltaire.

L’édition, contrairement à toutes celles qui l’avaient précédée, est, on le sait, chronologique. Elle met l’accent sur le lien entre la genèse et la publication des œuvres de Voltaire et ses expériences successives du monde et de la vie. C’est un choix qui crée des problèmes d’édition épineux, mais c’est un choix historique lié aux premières orientations du Cellf et de ses fondateurs. Pour résoudre les contradictions apparentes dans la pensée de Voltaire, que la critique ne cessait de souligner, René Pomeau avait opéré une révolution épistémologique dans sa grande thèse sur La Religion de Voltaire : au lieu d’étudier le système de pensée de l’écrivain, il avait suivi les étapes de son existence, montrant comment sa pensée avait évolué, parfois fluctué, en rapport avec les circonstances. C’est cette démarche que reprenait le projet des Œuvres complètes.

Mais c’est aussi cette démarche qui justifiait un grand projet collectif qui se développa parallèlement et se réalisa tout entier dans les murs du Cellf : une grande biographie renouvelée, intitulée Voltaire en son temps. L’équipe des voltairistes du Cellf réalisa ce vaste travail de 1985 à 1994, de façon largement collective, tous les apports individuels étant préparés par des réunions au Cellf, auxquelles participait parfois le représentant d’alors de la VF, Andrew Brown, et aussi des personnalités comme Jacques Van den Heuvel, André-Michel Rousseau, Jacqueline Marchand. Chaque volume avait son responsable; Jean Dagen et moi, qui devions plus tard diriger le Cellf successivement, avons eu en charge les volumes IV et V. L’ensemble était unifié par une révision de René Pomeau, qui écrivit lui-même par ailleurs d’importants développements. La première édition de ce travail désormais fondamental et partout cité comme la biographie savante de référence fut publiée en cinq volumes successifs à la Voltaire Foundation.

Couverture du premier volume de Voltaire en son temps.

Couverture du premier volume de Voltaire en son temps (Oxford, 1985).

Quand cette biographie fut terminée, les réunions plénières annuelles en juin de l’ensemble de l’équipe ne s’arrêtèrent pas. Nous étions soucieux d’assurer l’avenir des études voltairistes en France et ailleurs. Ces réunions se transformèrent en « journées Voltaire » qui continuent et réunissent les spécialistes de toutes les générations autour des chercheurs du Cellf et les collaborateurs de la Voltaire Foundation, réunis dans une « Société des Études voltairiennes » qui a son siège au Cellf. L’actuel président de la SEV est Nicholas Cronk, directeur de la Voltaire Foundation, marque de notre étroite collaboration. Les « journées Voltaire » sont devenues le cadre d’un colloque annuel à la Sorbonne dont les actes sont ponctuellement publiés aux PUPS, avec le soutien actif du Cellf, dans une revue de bonne diffusion, intitulée Revue Voltaire. Cette année, les 22 et 23 juin, le colloque avait pour sujet « Voltaire du Rhin au Danube » et réunissait de nombreux chercheurs d’Europe centrale. Il était organisé par Guillaume Métayer, brillant chercheur du CNRS au Cellf où il représente la troisième génération de voltairistes puisqu’il a été mon doctorant, alors que j’avais été le doctorant de René Pomeau.

Pendant une dizaine d’années j’ai animé en outre dans la salle Jean Fabre du Cellf un séminaire « Voltaire » hebdomadaire qui accueillait des étudiants avancés, des doctorants de toute nationalité, des étrangers en résidence, et d’autres encore. Ce séminaire très suivi a été honoré des interventions d’éminents spécialistes attachés à d’autres centres actifs, comme André Magnan, président de la Société de Ferney, ou Natalia Elaguina conservateur de la Bibliothèque de Voltaire à Saint-Pétersbourg, qui a été chercheur associé au Cellf ; tous deux ont fait partie de notre équipe « Voltaire en son temps ». Le séminaire « Voltaire » se perpétue au Cellf, notamment ces dernières années sur les œuvres théâtrales et leur réception, sous la direction de Pierre Frantz et de Sophie Marchand, désormais sous celle de Renaud Bret-Vitoz et Glenn Roe, récemment nommés à la Sorbonne et devenus ainsi membres du Cellf.

Dans les années 1960, quand j’ai commencé ma carrière, Voltaire était largement éclipsé, dans la recherche dix-huitiémiste, par Rousseau et par Diderot, qui paraissaient plus tournés vers la modernité. Le Cellf a depuis lors participé à une incontestable révolution. Depuis la création de notre laboratoire, les recherches sur Voltaire y ont été particulièrement fécondes. Dans cette fécondité, le rôle de la Voltaire Foundation a été important, d’abord comme un stimulant parce qu’il fallait que l’édition des Œuvres complètes avance. Elle a si bien avancé, grâce à son maître d’œuvre, Nicholas Cronk, qu’elle est sur le point de s’achever. Si Nicholas Cronk est l’efficace directeur de l’édition, c’est l’un des membres de l’équipe du Cellf, Christiane Mervaud, qui est la présidente d’honneur de l’entreprise. C’est dire notre étroite collaboration. Cette collaboration a porté sur les méthodes, sur les savoirs, sur les interprétations. Si nous proposons à la communauté internationale des chercheurs un Voltaire pour notre temps, c’est que nous nous sommes inlassablement entraidés pour mettre tout le savoir de notre temps au service d’une meilleure connaissance de Voltaire.

– Sylvain Menant

[1] Un Siècle de Deux Cents Ans?, éd. Jean Dagen et Philippe Roger, Paris, Desjonquères, 2004.

[2] Gillian Pink, Voltaire à l’ouvrage, Paris, CNRS éditions, 2018.

Visite présidentielle au Château de Voltaire

Françoise Nyssen (ministre de la Culture) et Emmanuel Macron

Françoise Nyssen (ministre de la Culture) et Emmanuel Macron. ©Aline Morel

Ce fut une belle journée…

Annoncée depuis plusieurs mois, dûment relayée par les médias, la réouverture du Château de Ferney le 31 mai dernier par le Président de la République, Emmanuel Macron, et la Première Dame, n’a pas manqué de lui conférer tout l’éclat qu’elle méritait.

Il est vrai qu’avec ses tons pastel, ses parquets lustrés, ses soieries lyonnaises et son mobilier en partie retrouvé, la demeure de Voltaire a recouvré une splendeur qu’on ne lui connaissait plus guère qu’à travers la maquette réalisée en 1779 par Morand à la demande de Catherine II. Comme lavée par les orages de la veille, la demeure du seigneur de Ferney est ainsi réapparue sous un soleil éclatant dans un état qu’on ne lui avait sans doute plus connu depuis 1766.

Emmanuel Macron

Emmanuel Macron. ©Aline Morel

Manifestement heureux et ému de perpétuer le rite de « l’indispensable visite », le couple présidentiel ne s’est pas contenté d’apprécier la restauration à bien des égards exemplaire menée sous l’égide du Centre des Monuments Nationaux et de François Chatillon, Architecte en Chef des Monuments historiques : la symbolique des lieux, brillamment rappelée par François Jacob, trouvait une saveur particulière à travers les extraits de quelques grands textes ferneysiens lus avec une diction parfaite par Clément Hervieu-Léger, sociétaire de la Comédie française (Épître à Horace, L’Ingénu, Dictionnaire philosophique, Traité sur la tolérance, Questions sur l’Encyclopédie, L’Évangile du jour).

Brigitte et Emmanuel Macron

Brigitte et Emmanuel Macron. ©Charlotte Low

À n’en pas douter, les quelque 300 invités triés sur le volet se souviendront longtemps de cette journée particulière et de son ambiance digne d’une Garden party. C’est particulièrement le cas des acteurs locaux qui ont œuvré pendant plus de quinze ans pour que cette journée arrive et que le Président de la République, avec élégance, a tenu à remercier publiquement.

– Olivier Guichard
Attaché culturel (Ferney-Voltaire)

Arrivée du couple présidentiel au Château de Voltaire

Arrivée du couple présidentiel au Château de Voltaire. ©Ville de Ferney-Voltaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Le couple présidentiel et la ministre de la Culture avec le conseil municipal de la Ville de Ferney-Voltaire

Le couple présidentiel et la ministre de la Culture avec le conseil municipal de la Ville de Ferney-Voltaire. ©Ville de Ferney-Voltaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Le couple présidentiel et la ministre de la culture

Le couple présidentiel et la ministre de la Culture en compagnie d’Olga Givernet, députée de la 3ème circonscription de l’Ain (à gauche de la photo), Philippe Bélaval, président du Centre des monuments nationaux (en costume gris clair), Jean Deguerry, président du conseil départemental de l’Ain (à droite de M. Bélaval), Daniel Raphoz, maire de Ferney-Voltaire (avec l’écharpe tricolore). ©Catherine Meillier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brigitte et Emmanuel Macron

De gauche à droite: Philippe Bélaval, Jean Deguerry, Daniel Raphoz, Olga Givernet, Brigitte et Emmanuel Macron, Françoise Nyssen. ©Catherine Meillier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Les manuscrits à la VF: découvertes et partage

First page of ‘Assassins section 2de’

Début de la copie de l’article ‘Assassins section 2de’ (Voltaire Foundation: ms.73 [Lespinasse 3], p.14).

Une petite armoire à la Voltaire Foundation abrite une collection modeste de manuscrits dont la plupart datent du dix-huitième siècle. Rassemblés par notre fondateur, Theodore Besterman, tous les documents ne concernent pas forcément (ou uniquement) Voltaire: récemment nous avons accueilli des chercheurs de l’équipe des Œuvres complètes de d’Alembert, un collègue de la British Library, et j’ai aussi été contactée par le responsable du projet de l’Inventaire Condorcet, qui me demandait de vérifier des références et de fournir, pour leur beau site, des photos de certaines lettres que Voltaire avait adressées à Condorcet dont nous possédons des copies d’époque.

C’est en cherchant une de ces lettres, en feuilletant un volume de papiers laissés par Mlle de Lespinasse, que je suis tombée sur un texte de Voltaire qui m’était familier, et cela depuis dix ans, car c’est en 2008 que j’ai participé à l’édition du second volume des Questions sur l’Encyclopédie dans les Œuvres complètes de Voltaire. Par un heureux hasard, la découverte coïncidait avec le travail de préparation de l’introduction des mêmes Questions, qui paraîtra dans quelques mois. Il ne s’agissait aucunement d’une hallucination: le texte, ‘Assassins section 2de’, est bel et bien celui de l’article ‘Assassinat’ de cet ouvrage de Voltaire en forme d’encyclopédie (article au demeurant assez méchant, où l’auteur s’attaque à Jean-Jacques Rousseau).

Selon la note inscrite en marge du titre de ce texte dans le manuscrit Lespinasse (on la voit sur la photo), Voltaire envoya l’article à D’Alembert avec sa lettre du 9 juillet 1770 (D16505). Ce qui m’a surprise, c’est que l’inclusion de cette ‘pièce jointe’ n’est pas signalée dans l’édition de la correspondance de Voltaire procurée par Theodore Besterman. La chose étonne surtout étant donné que celui-ci connaissait déjà le volume manuscrit au moment de préparer son édition (cette copie est l’unique source de la lettre qui nous occupe), et en fournit la référence dans l’apparat critique de la lettre. Il a donc apparemment jugé qu’il n’était pas pertinent de mentionner ce témoignage concernant l’envoi de l’article avec la lettre. Pourtant, il est extrêmement intéressant pour quiconque s’intéresse à la diffusion et à la pré-publication des Questions de savoir que cet article figure parmi ceux que l’auteur envoya à D’Alembert, l’un des deux responsables de l’Encyclopédie, ouvrage avec lequel les Questions entrent pour ainsi dire en dialogue.

La question se pose évidemment de savoir si le copiste disait vrai ou s’il se trompait… Mais cette petite histoire d’une trouvaille inattendue illustre l’évolution de l’esprit de l’édition critique sur la quarantaine d’années qui se sont écoulées depuis la parution de la seconde édition de la correspondance de Voltaire dans les années 1970. On a beaucoup plus tendance de nos jours à prêter attention aux détails matériels des sources et à incorporer ces indices à l’apparat critique. D’un point de vue personnel, je suis contente d’avoir trouvé ce manuscrit avant et non pas après la parution de l’introduction des Questions – où Christiane Mervaud s’intéresse à la genèse et à la diffusion de ce texte – et heureuse aussi de constater qu’il ne présente aucune variante textuelle par rapport aux deux autres manuscrits connus de cet article, qui sont conservés, assez bizarrement, dans la même armoire à la Voltaire Foundation.

– Gillian Pink

 

 

Collaborative editing OCV-style: a text’s journey across continents and over the years

As a long-standing editor of the Œuvres complètes de Voltaire (OCV), who regularly visits 99 Banbury Road whenever he is in the UK, Andrew Hunwick was asked for his reminiscences of being an OCV contributor in this the fiftieth year since the start of the series…

Theodore Besterman.

Theodore Besterman.

At the University of Western Australia, when the academic year ends in November, the mind turns to the need for research and publication. For this particular Australian editor, I especially need the resources of the Paris Bibliothèque nationale. Back in 1972, Qantas was offering a greatly discounted return air fare to London – including free return hop to Paris!

In the hope also of getting my doctoral thesis published, I approached Theodore Besterman, editor of the Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century. He wrote back, saying, ‘By all means give me a ring when you get near these parts’ (the Voltaire Foundation was then at his home, Thorpe Mandeville House in Oxfordshire). This I did, from Paddington Station, and when I eventually got round to discussing possible research projects on Voltaire, he suddenly engaged: ‘Ah, now you’re talking! You’d better come here today, and stay to lunch.’ It was ThB who suggested I become a contributor to the Voltaire Œuvres complètes by contacting general editor William Barber at the University of London. William said there were a handful of opuscules requiring an editor and I gratefully accepted – not realising that I would still be engaged on them years later…

The first step was to locate any extant manuscripts of these four texts. ThB had told me of the important volume 77 of the Studies, containing all the locations of manuscripts and printed editions, as compiled by William Trapnell. At the BN there were two surviving manuscripts of only one of my texts, the Mandement du père Alexis – published this month in OCV, volume 60B.

Teaching and marking took most of my time during the academic year, especially (to ThB’s disbelief) as I was teaching all of French literature, not just the eighteenth century. Yet although our library had the Moland edition of Voltaire, Studies, and the first edition of the Correspondence, I wasn’t able to work on my opuscules until I got study leave, in August 1974. To obtain a carte de lecteur for the BN was about 40 Francs, and this also got me into the Département des manuscrits, where I set about palaeographically transcribing my two documents, one in Voltaire’s hand, the other in secretary Wagnière’s. The former became my base text (nowadays for OCV the first printed edition is often used). In order to establish variants, I found it helpful to read the manuscript aloud, recording it onto a cassette. I then played this back on a Walkman, while comparing it with each of the sources one after the other, noting down any differences.

Obtaining access to the first printed editions proved, in the long run, to be something of a problem. I had assumed that all would be held by the BN. In the event, it was not until my edition of the Mandement was at proof stage that I learned of the existence of edition ‘65a’ (not held by the BN) – which then swiftly became my new base text after consultation with a photocopy provided by the Vf.

One of my opuscules was the book reviews Voltaire contributed in 1777 to the Journal de politique et de littérature from 25 April to 5 July (OCV, vol.80C, list, p.12). As I saw it, my task was to read these books myself, in order to have some basis for assessing Voltaire’s views. Sterne’s Tristram Shandy provided no difficulty, being readily available in our university library. But how was I to consult the four others? In those days (1975) there was no e-mail, internet or Google. No copies were held in any Australian library, and in any case it was unlikely that any library anywhere would be willing to lend its copies of what would undoubtedly have been classed as ‘rare’ books.

I was also busy preparing my doctoral thesis for publication, and my next ‘long period of uninterrupted concentration’ (the stated criterion for ‘humanities’-type research in the detailed submission made to the Australian Senate) would not be until my next study leave in mid-1979. By this time I had arranged to visit Cambridge (accommodation with friends) and acquire a reader’s card to use in their library, which held the ‘rare’ titles I needed to consult. I wasn’t even required to wear special gloves, or keep the pages open with a ‘sausage’, as I found was still the case in 2010 in the Rare Book sections of most of the Paris libraries.

I obtained what I needed from the Cambridge library, and found ‘chapter and verse’ for all the other references contained in Voltaire’s footnotes. I roughed out by hand my introduction to this opuscule and the books reviewed therein, as well as listing by hand, as far as possible, all my own footnotes in numerical order.

When I resumed my university duties, in 3rd term 1979, my teaching and marking loads were considerable (I was also supervising two Honours students’ mémoires), but after exam marking I found time to type up fair copies of the work completed on leave. Happily our part-time typist had earlier typed copies for me of Voltaire’s own texts, and eventually my complete typescripts were compiled by the third week in December 1979. These I photocopied and posted, with a covering letter, to William Barber (by this time he and Giles Barber of the Taylorian had become the OCV editors), who promptly acknowledged receipt of my work. Well, as most readers will know, my editions, as well as those of other contributors, did not become the object of actual publication for quite some time… but that, decidedly, is another story.

– Andrew Hunwick

Note from the Vf: OCV volume 60B is finally published this month. The very last of the collectaneous volumes in the series, the Œuvres de 1764-1766 contains twelve texts and some shorter verse. Work on it began as early as 1979 (see above). It involved eleven contributors along the way, and had passed through the hands of five of the in-house editorial team before it was typeset (four on the bibliography alone). It required eleventh-hour library checking in Paris by a willing student, and emergency call-outs to several OCV editors for last-minute problem-solving, including asking someone’s uncle in Canada to visit a local academic’s home to take photos to verify a manuscript variant. Impressive teamwork at the final hurdle meant that 60B kept its allocated slot in the tight OCV publication schedule. The complex logistics had been further compounded by the initial inclusion of the edition of the Collection des lettres sur les miracles by José-Michel Moureaux (who, sadly, died in 2012) and Olivier Ferret, which then moved to its own separate volume (60D), to be published this Spring.

– KC

Exploring Parisian archives thanks to the BSECS/Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment Travel Award

Tabitha Baker is a 3rd-year PhD student at the University of Warwick and V&A Museum. Her thesis is entitled ‘The Embroidery Trade in Eighteenth-Century France’ and is an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Partnership project supervised jointly by Professor Giorgio Riello (Warwick) and Professor Lesley Miller (V&A).

On a visit to the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in 1903, Beatrix Potter was shown an elaborately embroidered French velvet coat from the 1780s. Inspired by the sparkling embroidery which had retained its brilliance for over a century, an illustration of the coat was to appear on page 12 of her children’s story, The Tailor of Gloucester. The coat was later displayed in 1987-88 as part of the Beatrix Potter exhibition at the Tate Gallery, and remains a stunning example of eighteenth-century court dress. Eighteenth-century French embroidered clothing in the collections of the V&A and museums around the world is displayed for its technical excellence and beauty. Yet these objects are also the products of a deeply hierarchical and complex luxury trade, the socio-economic intricacies of which have been little studied to date.

Coat

Ensemble (coat), France, 1780s. 1611&A-1900. © Victoria and Albert Museum.

My research examines the relationship between the consumption and professional production of fashionable embroidery for clothing and furnishings in eighteenth-century France (c.1660-1791), with a particular focus on Paris and Lyon. By using archival sources alongside surviving embroidered objects from museums in the UK, France and the US, I investigate how embroidery techniques changed over time, how the trade functioned in different cities, and the nature of the professional embroiderers’ clientele.

Embroidery was a well-established trade in France by the time the ‘Beatrix Potter’ coat was produced, readily supplying the luxury clothing and furnishings market in the major cities of France and elsewhere in Europe. Due to their dealings with elite customers who were in a position to command long cycles of credit, it was not uncommon for professional embroiderers who ran large workshops to find themselves in precarious financial situations and succumb to bankruptcy.

The BSECS/Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment Travel Award enabled me to go to France in June 2017 to undertake detailed research on the bankruptcy records of the professional embroiderers of eighteenth-century Paris. At the Archives de Paris, I discovered more about their customers, orders, prices and delivery timeframes. This led me to analyse more fully the working practices of professional embroiderers during this period, including how long it took to produce and deliver to the client different types of embroidery, and how the cost of producing embroidery varied over the course of the eighteenth century.

Waistcoat, France, 1730s

Waistcoat, France, 1730-1739. 252-1906. © Victoria and Albert Museum.

An item such as this waistcoat (left), elaborately embroidered in coloured silk and silver threads and which can be seen today at the V&A, is one example of the fashion for luxuriously embroidered clothing at the royal court and the types of commissions taken on by the professional embroiderers of Paris. The order books that I have been working on at the Archives de Paris suggest that embroidery in gold and silver, popular amongst members of the French nobility, could have cost anything between 800 and 2500 livres to purchase, and such orders were placed with embroiderers at the top end of the occupational hierarchy, usually embroiderers to the king and court.

Due to their economic and social standing, customers of this calibre were able to purchase expensive luxury products such as these waistcoats on a long credit cycle, meaning that products would not be paid for in full until months or even years after the receipt of the product. Embroiderers who supplied the wealthy nobility were therefore caught up in a credit cycle, and were often owed great sums by their clients, as can be seen in many of the bankruptcy files.

Thanks to the generosity of BSECS and the Besterman Centre for the Enlightenment, my findings from this period of research have enabled me to make significant progress on my examination of the structure of the professional embroidery trade and how the embroiderers’ occupation reacted to a fluctuating consumer market. A close analysis of how embroidery was consumed in France during the eighteenth century, and the effects this consumption had on the structure of the French embroidery trade, will, I hope, contribute to a greater understanding of the relationship between elite consumption and the French luxury trades.

– Tabitha Baker